Emma Carew Grovum

Journalist. Baker. Cook. Lover of pandas. Enthusiasm for the places where great print and web journalism collide, diversity in the media, excellent bagels, Apple products, Star Wars film trilogy, Korean barbecue and walking the fine line between coffee and tea. Also found at www.philanthropy.com & http://diversify.journalismwith.me
Recent Tweets @emmacarew
Posts tagged "aaja"

For the past 11 months, I’ve been working with AAJA’s national leadership team and programming chair to build out programming for our annual convention. 

I was thrilled to have been tapped by this opportunity, especially given my work curating a diverse web journalism speakers list. My goals from the outset were to increase the diversity of the speakers, including getting more young speakers on sessions and panels. 

Our speaker list is published here

Major caveat: being a group of journalists of color, we were at a somewhat natural advantage. Still, in years past, I’ve been disappointed by the lack of diversity represented at some of the conference sessions. 

How do we inspire the next generation of journalists to embrace diversity and become advocates when we’re trotting out panels that don’t reflect our mission?

We invited an AAJA member to lead every single session, which means we’re highlighting the amazing work our members do all year and makes them more seasoned speakers to be poached by other conferences.

In addition to racial diversity, our attendees will see an impressive array of gender and age. There are more than 27 sessions that are being led by women. At least 15 speakers are well under age 30 and more than a few are first-time speakers. 

We were clear that diversity was a priority when we invited our members to lead sessions: “While every speaker does not need to be Asian or a member of AAJA, we encourage you to consider racial, gender and age diversity as you seek panelists for your session.” 

I attended Spark Camp last year and really love their method of inviting half their guests, then having their chosen guests invite another guest to ensure they’re reaching an audience that goes beyond the pool of “usual suspects.” I’m also a fan of Deanna Zandt’s #one4one campaign to raise the profile of digital influencers from all backgrounds.

Next year for AAJA programming, I’m hoping to incorporate these concepts in our call for proposals. Maybe make it mandatory that for every session someone pitches, they would need to include a suggested speaker who is a student, recent graduate or emerging star — someone full of potential that our organization should be encouraging to grow as a speaker. 

Through this process, I’ve been incredibly inspired by the work being done by and conversations I’ve had with Jeanne Brooks and Lisa Williams at the Online News Association, as well as Tiffany Shackelford at the Association of Alt Weeklies. 

Our conference in New York City is just a few weeks away. I hope our AAJA members gain great value from the speakers we’ve assembled. I’m looking forward to getting the feedback and working again next year to make the programming even stronger for 2014. 

I’m part of a community called the Tech Lady Mafia, and this topic of diversifying conferences comes up often. This post has been adapted from emails I’ve sent contributing to those conversations. 

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Resources, tips and ideas for AAJA convention go-ers: 

* Need help packing? Check out our crowd-sourced Pinterest boards full of ideas for what is and isn’t convention-appropriate. 

* Be sure to add the sched.org app to your phone and start planning out your sessions. 

* Planning to hit the job fair? Get your resume prepared with NABJ’s Benet Wilson with this webinar or listen to AAJA’s podcast with convention co-chair Brooke Camp and convention session leader Lars Schmidt about how to stand out in the crowd. 

* All that networking is sure to work up an appetite, so check out our AAJAEats page with tips from AAJA-ers and locals on where to eat near the convention hotel. 

* Prepare for George Kiriyama’s Sixth Annual Korean BBQ night, where we hope to flood 32nd St with convention goers. Do your research ahead of time for the best bulgogi, kalbi and Korean fried chicken stops!

*  Still on the fence about attending? Let AAJA past president, Sharon Chan, convince you

* More questions? Check out my post with advice for building your network, saving a few bucks, and making some new friends from last summer’s UNITY conference.

emmacarew:

This time next week, I’ll be on my way to Las Vegas for 5 days at the UNITY Journalists convention, a once-every-four-years joint conference among AAJA, NAHJ, NAJA and NLGJA

My first UNITY was in 2008 in Chicago — I was still a student, looking for my next big internship, and scared as hell. UNITY is a large event and can be incredibly overwhelming. 

So, with that in mind — here’s my two cents of advice to first-time convention goers:

* Talk to everyone—but be mindful of people’s time! If someone’s group of friends appears to be leaving them behind because they are still talking to you, exchange contact information and let them be on they’re way. On the flip side, if you’re a UNITY veteran and you meet a newbie who appears to not have arrived with an entourage, adopt him or her and introduce them to your crowd.

* Bring business cards, and lots of ‘em. Good places to pick them up for cheap are Vistaprint.com and Moo.com (the former is probably cheaper, though at this late date you’d have to pay rush shipping, I think; the latter creates beautiful photo-based cards and has integration with Facebook and can pull from your cover photos album to show) and pass them out like candy. Stay organized with the ones you receive. 

* Dress professionally! My mentor, Benet Wilson, created a group "What to Wear at NABJ" board on Pinterest, which is a great resource for UNITY-goers. She also has a "What Not To Wear" board for folks who aren’t real clear on the line between classy and not-so-classy falls. Also, it’s usually freezing in conference rooms despite the blazing heat outside. Layers are key.

* Follow up quickly. If you meet a new contact that you hope to stay in touch with, shoot them an email to thank them for their time or ask a follow up question. If you meet someone who gave you great advice, invested a lot of time with you or helped you make another great connection, send them a thank you card. Yes, a real, cardstock, in-the-physical-post-office-mail thank you card.

* Socialize! If you’re young or new to one of the alliance organizations, the best thing you can do is meet people who are leaders, movers and shakers. Get to know folks “off the clock” and become part of the fold. 

* Label your gear. A thousand tech-savvy and tech-dependent folks running around a small space for 5 days? Yeah, that’s a lot of iPads, iPhones and a sea of white chargers laying about. Put your name on yours. 

* Pack snacks. If you’re watching your budget, one of the fastest ways these conferences can get expensive is by eating at the convention center every day. UNITY in Chicago was sort of isolated and there weren’t a ton of off-site, walkable lunch options. Throw some almonds or granola bars in your bag so you aren’t 100% reliant on $12-a-plate cafeteria lunches.

* Share the wealth! Not everyone can attend UNITY and once you’re there no one can attend all of the great sessions they’d love to. If you’re in a great panel, consider blogging or tweeting some of the insights you pick up (and share on the #UNITY12 hashtag, of course). 

* Please, read this: How to Ask Questions at a Panel. It was floating around during SXSW this year and I hope we can apply it at UNITY. Ask questions at panels, contribute to the discussion, but please don’t waste people’s time by self-promoting or picking fights with the panelists.

— 

See you in Vegas!

Updated: 

See you in New York!

Happy 40th to our fabulous AAJA president, Paul Cheung!! Whether it’s Gangnam-Style or AP Style, Paul’s the go-to guy.

Paul: it’s been an honor to work with you and grow from your guidance over the past year. Thank you for believing in my potential. AAJA has only benefitted from your dedication, your passion and your flair.

Here’s to making your next 40 years equally as fabulous!!

Happy birthday!!


Emma

Update: It’s Paul’s wish that folks celebrate his birthday by donating to AAJA’s Power of One campaign to help secure a bright future for AAJA and the journalists of color we support. 

A year ago, while Paul Cheung was running for AAJA National President, I posed the question to him about how AAJA can better serve our young and early career journalists, and how we can better recognize their amazing work in the field. 

His answer involved four key strategies, three of which I think we’ve made great strides on in the first year of his leadership: 

* Using the AAJA website to showcase our members with mini profiles: this happened for photographers during AAPI heritage month, but we’re still not great about this throughout the year, and with a focus on AAJA’s rising stars. 

* Re-establish the mentoring program: Paul, working with Randall Yip and Joe Grimm, has relaunched the mentorship program this year, combining the broadcast and print/online groups. 30-minute career counseling sessions are also being offered this year—I don’t think this is necessarily new, but it appears to be newly focused on early career members. 

* Better showcase the work our members do: I’ve spent the past 10 months working on the programming committee and am pleased with the number of young members we’re featuring as speakers this year. There are at least 15 speakers under age 30 this year, and at least a handful are entry-level and first-time speakers. To me, it’s important for the “AAJA family” to be among the first to show support and good faith for these emerging speakers and experts. 

* Expand affinity groups to focus on segments of the industry: We’re not set up formally yet, but programming for this year’s convention is created around specific journalism “tracks”: broadcast, photo, social media, data/design, reporting/editing. This should make it easier for convention-goers to identify and engage with other members who are doing similar work in the field. 

So hats off to Paul for his wonderful leadership, the board for their continued support of AAJA’s young members, and Tom Huang, this year’s convention programming chair, for allowing the infusion of young members into this year’s speaker roster.

AAJA can continue to do more to recognize the talent and potential of our younger members. A few ideas I’ll toss out:

* Student Member of the Year award

* Rising Star awards (I believe NABJ has these) for print, visual, broadcast, online, etc.

* Regular Twitter chats or Google hangouts with student members and board members

* Special event at convention for members with 1-5 years experience (the pre-ELP crowd), whether it be as casual as a meetup or a more formalized program. 

Two years ago, when Neal ran for AAJA President, this is the endorsement that I wrote:

AAJA members, please join me in supporting Neal Justin for AAJA president. 

Neal has been a fierce supporter of students and young journalists. He’s a tough mentor, but 8 years after meeting him in high school, I’ve never one regretted taking his advice. 

Neal continues to be an active member at a time when many of his age peers have “retired.” He has long demonstrated a commitment to making AAJA better every chance he gets. 

We face, among many issues, a leadership crisis. Few students come back to convention each year. Fewer young members step up to run for board positions. 

Consider Neal’s work with J-Camp, local high school students at ThreeSixty Journalism, and AAJA’s mentorship program. He’s recognizing the crisis, and helping to groom the next generation of leaders. 

No one gets off the hook easily with Neal, and that’s something you need in a leader. But when you show up, Neal shows up and then some.

In the two years that followed that election, Neal turned his efforts local and put a great deal of work into supporting the Minnesota chapter. At the time, I was chapter co-president, and in 2011 our work was recognized by the National Board with the Chapter of the Year award. 

I have worked extensively with Neal both in my capacity as a chapter president, and during my tenure leading the AAJA Print/Online mentorship program. Neal has been instrumental in trying to find solutions to fill the current programming gaps we have for serving young journalists. 

Neal’s ideas are innovative and exciting, and he has the tenacity to bring them to fruition. His drive inspires other to work harder and create stronger solutions. Please join me in supporting his bid for AAJA VP of Print. 

In order to cast your vote for Neal, you must first ensure you are a full* AAJA member in good standing. Check for your name on AAJA’s national roster here. Then watch your inbox for a ballot that will be sent Feb. 11, 2013. 

 

* PO’d that you’re a student member who can’t vote in the special election? Neal has mentioned this issue specifically on his candidate Facebook page

When we made the decision to move from Minnesota this year, one of the biggest losses I’ve felt was that of the AAJA Minnesota chapter. I had spent six years as a member of the Minnesota chapter, five of them serving on the board as student representative and co-president. The AAJA Minnesota board became not only a source of my incredible mentors, but great friends who felt like a family. 

I’ve decided to apply my experience working on a local chapter in our new home, and am currently running for Vice President for Online within the AAJA DC chapter. 

Any AAJA DC full members, I’d greatly appreciate your vote and support. 

In the contested chapter president race, I’m backing POLITICO’s Seung-Min Kim. Her candidacy statement is included on the ballot emailed to all chapter members eligible to vote. I’ve been impressed with her leadership since moving to the area and am excited about her ideas to continue leading the chapter. 

AAJA DC is also seeking members to step up to fill positions of treasurer, community liaison and member outreach. 

This time next week, I’ll be on my way to Las Vegas for 5 days at the UNITY Journalists convention, a once-every-four-years joint conference among AAJA, NAHJ, NAJA and NLGJA

My first UNITY was in 2008 in Chicago — I was still a student, looking for my next big internship, and scared as hell. UNITY is a large event and can be incredibly overwhelming. 

So, with that in mind — here’s my two cents of advice to first-time convention goers:

* Talk to everyone—but be mindful of people’s time! If someone’s group of friends appears to be leaving them behind because they are still talking to you, exchange contact information and let them be on they’re way. On the flip side, if you’re a UNITY veteran and you meet a newbie who appears to not have arrived with an entourage, adopt him or her and introduce them to your crowd.

* Bring business cards, and lots of ‘em. Good places to pick them up for cheap are Vistaprint.com and Moo.com (the former is probably cheaper, though at this late date you’d have to pay rush shipping, I think; the latter creates beautiful photo-based cards and has integration with Facebook and can pull from your cover photos album to show) and pass them out like candy. Stay organized with the ones you receive. 

* Dress professionally! My mentor, Benet Wilson, created a group "What to Wear at NABJ" board on Pinterest, which is a great resource for UNITY-goers. She also has a "What Not To Wear" board for folks who aren’t real clear on the line between classy and not-so-classy falls. Also, it’s usually freezing in conference rooms despite the blazing heat outside. Layers are key.

* Follow up quickly. If you meet a new contact that you hope to stay in touch with, shoot them an email to thank them for their time or ask a follow up question. If you meet someone who gave you great advice, invested a lot of time with you or helped you make another great connection, send them a thank you card. Yes, a real, cardstock, in-the-physical-post-office-mail thank you card.

* Socialize! If you’re young or new to one of the alliance organizations, the best thing you can do is meet people who are leaders, movers and shakers. Get to know folks “off the clock” and become part of the fold. 

* Label your gear. A thousand tech-savvy and tech-dependent folks running around a small space for 5 days? Yeah, that’s a lot of iPads, iPhones and a sea of white chargers laying about. Put your name on yours. 

* Pack snacks. If you’re watching your budget, one of the fastest ways these conferences can get expensive is by eating at the convention center every day. UNITY in Chicago was sort of isolated and there weren’t a ton of off-site, walkable lunch options. Throw some almonds or granola bars in your bag so you aren’t 100% reliant on $12-a-plate cafeteria lunches.

* Share the wealth! Not everyone can attend UNITY and once you’re there no one can attend all of the great sessions they’d love to. If you’re in a great panel, consider blogging or tweeting some of the insights you pick up (and share on the #UNITY12 hashtag, of course). 

* Please, read this: How to Ask Questions at a Panel. It was floating around during SXSW this year and I hope we can apply it at UNITY. Ask questions at panels, contribute to the discussion, but please don’t waste people’s time by self-promoting or picking fights with the panelists.

— 

See you in Vegas!

Updated: 

pcheung630:

My thoughts on how AAJA can better connect with members via affinity groups.

Paul’s idea for creating “affinity groups” in AAJA is one of the big reasons I am supporting Paul’s campaign for AAJA national president. I believe this move is absolutely needed for AAJA to stay viable and forward looking. I’ve felt the tug myself as I have gotten more involved with the Online News Association and thought to myself, where are all these like-minded folks in AAJA?  


For the past three years, I have been heavily involved with AAJA’s National Print and Online Mentorship program. We haven’t yet found the success of our sister-program, the AAJA Broadcast Mentorship program but I believe the affinity groups Paul is pitching would be instrumental in revamping the mentorship program at the national level. 

Students and recent grads need to be able to find “their people” within the masses of AAJA. As a web journalist and social media editor, I’ve struggled in the early years of my career to find the right mentors and AAJA-ers who are on my same path. I think Paul’s proposed groups would eliminate that struggle for many of our members — especially as our industry continues to change so quickly. 

— 

Today is the LAST day to cast your electronic vote for the AAJA National election. If you will NOT be at the UNITY conference in Las Vegas Aug 1-3, be sure to vote today. 

You should have received an email from AAJA National with all of the instructions on how to vote early. You can vote online or fax your vote. The deadline to vote is TODAY, Monday, July 16 at 5 p.m. PDT. 

I hope you’ll join me in supporting Paul Cheung for AAJA President.

I *LOVE* this Pinterest board idea from my kick-ass mentor, Benet Wilson! She’s pulled together a “what to wear” board for the NABJ 2012 convention in New Orleans.

Whether it’s just an inspiration board for herself or a gentle how-to guide for students looking to navigate the world of career wear for the first time, it’s a great resource and a fun use of Pinterest. 

When I went to my first journalism conference (AAJA Miami, 2007), I honestly think I spent the most time worrying and asking questions about wardrobe. 

Well done, Benet!  

Why I’m supporting Paul Cheung for AAJA’s National President: 

I’m very excited about Paul’s ideas to fill the gaps in AAJA’s current programming and the opportunities and support that can be developed for members who are between student programming but not ready for ELP or other mid-career programs. 

I’ve been so impressed with Paul’s work on the 2012 UNITY programming this year for the Las Vegas and I believe his digital-forward focus will serve AAJA leadership and members will over the next few years. 

Paul’s big picture vision for AAJA and where we will go next is inspiring. Paul talks about wanting to make sure AAJA’s pipeline is full of AAJA members that their best, at every stage in their career. I hope you’ll join me in supporting Paul’s work and his candidacy for AAJA National President. 
Emma Carew Grovum

AAJA Minnesota co-president

pcheung630:

Our industry is going through an exhilarating transformation. Our business model is changing at a rapid pace and the expectations of what it takes to be a journalist are being redefined. I believe this is the most innovative time in journalism.

Friends, I am excited by the tasks ahead of us….